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dc.creatorIgnjatović, Aleksandar
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-31T11:22:19Z
dc.date.available2019-10-31T11:22:19Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0037-6795
dc.identifier.urihttp://raf.arh.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/238
dc.description.abstractBetween the second half of the nineteenth and middle of the twentieth century, Serbian national historiography developed a complex understanding of relationships between medieval Serbia and the Byzantine Empire. On the one hand, Serbia was seen as a cultural offspring of Byzantium and its most appropriate successor; on the other, historians dissociated the nation from Byzantium, elaborating on its cultural authenticity. Consequently, the position of Byzantium became rather ambivalent, being simultaneously seen as a 'national legacy' and the nation's political adversary and cultural obstacle. This article shows that the complex historiographical elaboration of Serbian-Byzantine relationships was part of a wider ideological structure which was crucial for justifying the nation's cultural exceptionalism, territorial expansionism and imperial ambitions.en
dc.publisherModern Humanities Research Association
dc.rightsrestrictedAccess
dc.sourceSlavonic and East European Review
dc.titleByzantium's Apt Inheritors: Serbian Historiography, Nation-Building and Imperial Imagination, 1882-1941en
dc.typearticle
dc.rights.licenseARR
dcterms.abstractИгњатовић, Aлександар;
dc.citation.volume94
dc.citation.issue1
dc.citation.spage57
dc.citation.other94(1): 57-92
dc.identifier.wos000368252800003
dc.identifier.doi10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.94.1.0057
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-84962129308
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion


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